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Monday, June 17, 2024

Ask a Rigger | Pilot-Chute Pouch Inspection

Ask a Rigger | Pilot-Chute Pouch Inspection
Monday, July 1, 2019

On containers using a throw-out deployment system, the elastic or nylon spandex (Spandura) bottom-of-container pilot-chute pouch—aka the BOC—is arguably one of the most important and visible components.

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Ask a Rigger

Ask a Rigger
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

The term “rigger” comes from sailing. According to the Federal Aviation Administration Parachute Rigger Handbook, the only place clean enough and big enough for riggers to work on parachutes in the early days was upstairs in an aircraft hangar, hence the term “rigging loft.”

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Article rating: 2.2

Ask a Rigger | Swapping Components

Ask a Rigger | Swapping Components
Friday, March 1, 2019

Federal Aviation Administration Senior Rigger D.J. Styles instantly knew there was something wrong with a new customer’s cutaway cables when reinstalling them after a routine reserve inspection and repack of a rig the customer had purchased used less than a year earlier. Styles routinely measures cables for new customers, as well as anytime he replaces a lost handle, but this time the cutaway cables were several inches longer than the manufacturer’s specifications, and it was apparent there was a problem even without measuring.

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Article rating: 3.0

Keep an Eye Out | RSL Lanyard

Keep an Eye Out | RSL Lanyard
Friday, February 1, 2019

While performing a routine gear check on another jumper, the inspecting jumper noticed that the reserve-static-line lanyard was tucked between the jumper’s shoulder and harness. This improper stowing could have caused the lanyard to snag, risking an unintentional reserve deployment. 

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Ask a Rigger | Bottoms Up

Ask a Rigger | Bottoms Up
Saturday, December 1, 2018

Q: Some rigs have the main bridle routed top to bottom over the closing flaps, and some rigs have bridles that come out from underneath the closing pin and then back down the same direction. Which is more correct?

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Article rating: .6
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